The non-Brit's guide to Britain's snap election

The non-Brit's guide to Britain's snap election

Wait, you say, didn’t the Brits just have an election two years ago? Yes, but the UK and Europe have changed a lot since 2015 (um, Brexit), so voters are headed back to the polls to help Britain forge a new path forward. General elections in the United Kingdom are supposed to be held every five years. (The next one was scheduled for 2020.) But an early, or snap, election can be held if at least two-thirds of lawmakers agree to it or if there’s a vote of no confidence…

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Brandis 'ought to know better' on Brighton gunman's parole release

Brandis 'ought to know better' on Brighton gunman's parole release

Updated June 07, 2017 23:47:21 Photo: Yacqub Khayre had a long history of criminal offences. (AAP: Julian Smith) The head of Victoria’s Adult Parole Board has hit out at Federal Attorney-General George Brandis for spreading “misinformation” about the prison release of Yacqub Khayre, the man at the centre of a terrorist attack in Brighton. Khayre killed newly married Nick Hao, 36, who was working at an apartment complex in Melbourne’s Bayside area on Monday, and took a woman hostage during a siege. He shot three police officers at the end…

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'Hijacked by a bunch of dickheads': The use and abuse of the Southern Cross

'Hijacked by a bunch of dickheads': The use and abuse of the Southern Cross

Posted June 07, 2017 09:26:58 Photo: Director Warwick Thornton faces off with Captain Cook, in bush toy form during the filming of his feature length documentary We Don’t Need A Map. (Supplied: Barefoot Communications) In 2010, filmmaker Warwick Thornton made an off-hand remark to a journalist, suggesting that the Southern Cross was morphing into a racist symbol — like the swastika. “People got very upset, and that scared the hell out of me,” he says. “I went and hid in the cupboard for a little while, and then over a…

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What the Qatar crisis is really about

What the Qatar crisis is really about

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (Sunni, US allies, conservative monarchies) lead a campaign to isolate neighboring Qatar (Sunni, US ally, conservative monarchy.) The charge: that Qatar “embraces various terrorist and sectarian groups aimed at destabilizing the region.” None of it seems to make sense. But all these events can be seen through the prism of a much larger struggle – about regional superiority, the war against terrorism and sectarian distrust between Sunni and Shia followers of Islam. And the main belligerents: Iran and Saudi Arabia. A mercurial emirate…

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