Shark feasts on whale carcass

Shark feasts on whale carcass

JUST in case you haven’t seen enough footage of sharks this week, here’s another video of a great white feasting on a whale carcass.  The team at Terra Australis filmed what they labelled “the biggest shark” they have seen on the west coast eating a whale carcass on Tuesday afternoon in Fremantle. Ryan Chatfield said he and fellow team members Johnny Debnam and Andre Rerekura arrived at North Mole about 5.30pm to capture some great footage with their drone. “We were lucky enough to film this 4-5 meter Great White…

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Renewable energy will kill people this winter, Liberal MP says

Renewable energy will kill people this winter, Liberal MP says

Posted July 13, 2017 06:48:39 Renewable energy is killing people this winter, Liberal backbencher Craig Kelly says. Mr Kelly said high power prices meant many households were unable to adequately heat their homes. “People will die,” he told AM. “We’ve seen reports only recently that one-in-four Australian households this winter will be frightened to turn the heater on because of the price of electricity. “We also know that the World Health Organisation has made it very clear that you increase winter mortality, that is you have more people dying in…

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These are the films the Government didn't want you to see

These are the films the Government didn't want you to see

By Aarti Betigeri Updated July 12, 2017 19:51:52 Video: Peeping Tom was banned in Australia (ABC News) Films that were considered too weird, too saucy, or simply too much for Australians at the time of their release are being revived. The series of banned or controversial films will be showcased at The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia in Canberra over the coming weeks. The Banned and the Beautiful exhibition has included films such as Catherine Breillart’s controversial 1999 movie about sex and desire, Romance, as well as a…

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'Make new rules' to save the oceans

'Make new rules' to save the oceans

Image copyrightGEORGETTE DOUWMA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY New rules are urgently needed to protect the open seas, scientists have warned. A report to a UN ocean conference in New York points out that more than 60% of the ocean has no rules because it’s outside national jurisdiction. It says the open ocean is at risk from climate change, over-fishing, deep sea mining, farm pollution and plastics. The authors say one area – the Bay of Bengal – is at a tipping point which could impact on global fish stocks. The report was…

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