Hospitalised assault injuries among women and girls

Hospitalised assault injuries among women and girls

This factsheet examines cases of hospitalised assault against women in 2013–14. Rates of assault among women were highest for those aged between 15–19 and 50–54. Over half (59%) of all these women were assaulted by bodily force, and for assaults by bodily force and involving sharp and blunt objects, the majority of injuries were to the head and neck (63%). Where information about the perpetrator was available, a spouse or domestic partner was the most commonly reported perpetrator (in 59% of cases). ISBN 978-1-76054-099-9; Cat. no. INJCAT 184; 5pp.; Internet…

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Serious unintentional injury involving a railway train or tram, Australia, 2009–10 to 2013–14

Serious unintentional injury involving a railway train or tram, Australia, 2009–10 to 2013–14

This report presents information on hospitalisations in Australia due to unintentional serious injury involving a train or tram for the 5-year period from 2009–10 to 2013–14. Over this 5-year period, there were 812 cases of serious injury involving a train (178 due to a level crossing collision), an average of 162 per year. Over the same period, there were 397 cases of serious injury involving a tram. ISSN 2205-510X (PDF) 1444-3791 (Print) ; ISBN 978-1-76054-100-2; Cat. no. INJCAT 177; 41pp.; $10 Download publication Table of contents Serious unintentional injury involving…

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Dog-related injuries

Dog-related injuries

This factsheet reports on hospitalisations that occurred as a result of being bitten or struck by a dog in 2013–14. In 2013–14, 3,644 hospitalised injury cases were due to being bitten by a dog, and 328 cases due to being struck by a dog. Overall, hospitalisations for dog-related injuries were more common in young children aged 0–9 (689 cases, 17%). ISBN 978-1-76054-097-5; Cat. no. INJCAT 186; 4pp.; Internet only Recommended citation AIHW 2017. Dog-related injuries. Cat. no. INJCAT 186. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 19 April 2017 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129559171>. Source link

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DIY injuries

DIY injuries

‘Do-it-yourself’ (DIY) refers to making, mending or maintaining something oneself, instead of hiring a professional or tradesperson. This factsheet looks at DIY injuries that occurred as a result of falls (for example, from ladders and buildings), and while using tools and machinery (for example, hand tools and lawnmowers) at home. In 2013–14, men aged 65+ were the most commonly hospitalised group due to 1 of these types of DIY injuries. ISBN 978-1-76054-096-8; Cat. no. INJCAT 185; 4pp.; Internet only Download fact sheet Fact sheet contents What are DIY injuries? Quick…

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Firearm injuries and deaths

Firearm injuries and deaths

This factsheet examines hospitalisations (2013–14) and deaths (2012–13) that occurred as a result of firearm-related injuries. Over 90% of all firearm-related hospitalisations and deaths occurred among men. Over a third of hospitalised cases were the result of unintentional injury, one-third (33%) resulted from assault, and in almost one-fifth (19%) of cases, intent was undetermined. In contrast, over 79% of deaths resulted from intentional self-harm (suicide), while over 17% resulted from assault (homicide). Rates of firearm-related injuries for deaths fell between 1999–00 and 2013–14. ISBN 978-1-76054-098-2; Cat. no. INJCAT 187; 6pp.;…

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