Golden eagle migration out of sync with climate change

Golden eagle migration out of sync with climate change

Image copyrightSPL Golden eagles in North America may have the timing of their migration shifted out of step with a seasonal boom in food they need to raise their young, according to scientists. A project to track the impact of climate change on migrating animals has revealed that adult golden eagles are unable to shift the timing of their migration. Lead researcher Scott LaPoint from Columbia University presented the findings at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union. He explained that day length, or photoperiod, appeared to give the…

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Mt Hope installed as 'UK's highest peak'

Mt Hope installed as 'UK's highest peak'

Image copyrightBAS/Alan Vaughan Image caption Mount Hope is more than twice the height of Ben Nevis in ScotlandBritain has a new tallest mountain. Mt Hope, which is sited in the part of the Antarctic claimed by the UK, was recently re-measured and found to tower above the previous title holder, Mt Jackson, by a good 50m (160ft). Hope is now put at 3,239m (10,626ft); Jackson is 3,184m (10,446ft). The map-makers at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) were prompted to take another look at the mountains because of concerns for the…

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Plastic planet

Plastic planet

Image copyrightGetty Images Marine life is facing “irreparable damage” from the millions of tonnes of plastic waste which ends up in the oceans each year, the United Nations has warned. “This is a planetary crisis… we are ruining the ecosystem of the ocean,” UN oceans chief Lisa Svensson told the BBC this week. But how does this happen, where is most at risk and what damage does this plastic actually do? Why is plastic problematic? Plastic as we know it has only really existed for the last 60-70 years, but…

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The 'Godfather of Coral' who's still diving at 72

The 'Godfather of Coral' who's still diving at 72

The ‘Godfather of Coral’ who’s still diving at 72 – BBC News “)}elsej.write(‘”)},confirm:function(a)return true,setFig:function(a,b)(function()a.orb=a.orb)(),deserialise:function(b)var a=;b.replace(/([a-z]2):([0-9]+)/g,function()a[RegExp.$1]=+RegExp.$2);return a}})();fig.manager.include();/*]]>*/ ‘); } } oqsSurveyManager(window, ‘ON’); /*]]>*/ ‘); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); } else document.write(”); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); document.write(‘‘); document.write(‘‘); if (/[?|&]ex-dp/.test(window.location.href) || document.cookie.indexOf(‘ex-dp=’) !== -1) bbcdotcom.utils.addHtmlTagClass(‘bbcdotcom-ex-dp’); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); if(document.location.protocol === “http:”) document.write(”); else document.write(”); } } /*]]>*/ Source link

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Narwhal escape: Whales freeze and flee when frightened

Narwhal escape: Whales freeze and flee when frightened

Image copyrightM P Heide Jorgensen Image caption These unicorns of the sea may face more human disturbance as sea ice declines in The ArcticScientists who fitted heart rate-monitoring tags to Arctic narwhals have discovered a strange paradox in how the animals respond to threats. When these tusked whales are frightened, their hearts slow, but at the same time they swim quickly to escape. Scientists say the response could be “highly costly” – because they exert themselves with a limited blood supply. The findings are published in the journal Science. Image…

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