Eclipse spectacle set to grip US public

Eclipse spectacle set to grip US public

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionWATCH: Solar eclipse photos will be used to create a “Megamovie”Skywatchers in the United States are preparing for the spectacular sight of a total solar eclipse. The Moon is set to pass in front of the Sun, casting a deep shadow that will sweep over the nation from Oregon in the west to South Carolina in the east. It is the first such event since 1918 where the path of darkness crosses both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. Indeed, it is the…

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How to watch a total solar eclipse

How to watch a total solar eclipse

How to watch a total solar eclipse – BBC News “)}elsej.write(‘”)},confirm:function(a)return true,setFig:function(a,b)(function()a.orb=a.orb)(),deserialise:function(b)var a=;b.replace(/([a-z]2):([0-9]+)/g,function()a[RegExp.$1]=+RegExp.$2);return a}})();fig.manager.include();/*]]>*/ ‘); } } oqsSurveyManager(window, ‘ON’); /*]]>*/ ‘); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); } else document.write(”); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); document.write(‘‘); document.write(‘‘); if (/[?|&]ex-dp/.test(window.location.href) || document.cookie.indexOf(‘ex-dp=’) !== -1) bbcdotcom.utils.addHtmlTagClass(‘bbcdotcom-ex-dp’); } })(); /*]]>*/ Source link

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The algae that terraformed Earth

The algae that terraformed Earth

Image copyrightStuart Hay/ANU Image caption The biomolecules were contained in oil extracted from deeply buried rockA planetary takeover by ocean-dwelling algae 650 million years ago was the kick that transformed life on Earth. That’s what geochemists argue in Nature this week, on the basis of invisibly small traces of biomolecules dug up from beneath the Australian desert. The molecules mark an explosion in the quantity of algae in the oceans. This in turn fuelled a change in the food web that allowed the first microscopic animals to evolve, the authors…

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Total solar eclipse: Meet Sharon and Billy Hahs

Total solar eclipse: Meet Sharon and Billy Hahs

Total solar eclipse: Meet Sharon and Billy Hahs – BBC News “)}elsej.write(‘”)},confirm:function(a)return true,setFig:function(a,b)(function();a.orb.figState=b)(),deserialise:function(b)var a=;b.replace(/([a-z]2):([0-9]+)/g,function()a[RegExp.$1]=+RegExp.$2);return a}})();fig.manager.include();/*]]>*/ ‘); } } oqsSurveyManager(window, ‘ON’); /*]]>*/ ‘); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); } else document.write(”); } })(); /*]]>*/ ‘); document.write(‘‘); document.write(‘‘); if (/[?|&]ex-dp/.test(window.location.href) || document.cookie.indexOf(‘ex-dp=’) !== -1) bbcdotcom.utils.addHtmlTagClass(‘bbcdotcom-ex-dp’); } })(); /*]]>*/ Source link

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Radioactive 'pooh sticks' trace carbon's ocean journey

Radioactive 'pooh sticks' trace carbon's ocean journey

Image copyrightGetty Images Image caption Scientists say iodine traces from Sellafield have travelled to the waters off BermudaRadioactive iodine from nuclear reprocessing plants in the UK and France has been detected deep in the waters near Bermuda. Scientists say the contaminants take a circuitous route travelling via the Arctic Ocean and down past Greenland. Researchers believe the radioactivity levels are extremely low and present no danger. However, scientists can use the iodine to accurately map the currents that transport greenhouse gases. Legally released One scientific consequence that arose from the…

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